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In this Sept. 2, 2015 file photo, protesters shouting Black Lives Matter hold up photos of people they claim are the victims of police violence as they block the hallway outside the governors office while successfully demanding the passage of AB953, in Sacramento. The states Racial and Identity Profiling Advisory (RIPA) Board, created by AB953,  said in its 2021 fourth annual report that people who were perceived as Black were more than twice as likely to be stopped as their percentage of the population would suggest. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

By Associated Press|

California board urges bias reviews of police social media  Pasadena Star News
California board urges bias reviews of police social media Pasadena Star News

January 4, 2021 at 11:39 p.m.

| UPDATED:

January 4, 2021 at 11:39 p.m.

California board urges bias reviews of police social media  Pasadena Star News
California board urges bias reviews of police social media Pasadena Star News

By DON THOMPSON

SACRAMENTO  California police agencies should routinely review officers social media, cellphones and computers for racist, bigoted or other offensive content that contributes to disproportionate police stops of Black people, a state advisory board said Monday.

The controversial recommendation comes from community and law enforcement representatives who analyzed nearly 4 million vehicle and pedestrian stopsby Californias 15 largest law enforcement agencies in 2019.

California board urges bias reviews of police social media  Pasadena Star News
California board urges bias reviews of police social media Pasadena Star News

The Racial and Identity Profiling Advisory Board report was unveiled amid calls to defund police and promises from state lawmakers to renew efforts to strip badges from bad officers, make more police misconduct records public, and allow community groups to handle mental health and drug calls where police powers may not be needed.

People who were perceived as Black were more than twice as likely to be stopped as their percentage of the population would suggest, the board said in its fourth annual report.

Black people also had the highest proportion of their stops (21%) for reasonable suspicion, while the most common reason for stops of people of all races was traffic viol